Top Three Wednesday: Non-fiction books

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Good day people of the internet! It is yet again Top Three Wednesday! This week’s theme is Top Three Non-Fiction Books! You can check all the themes here.

I immensely enjoy non-fiction books especially memoirs, but sadly I have not read much of it. Fret not, I included it on my Bookish New Year Resolution, so here’s to hoping I could cover a lot of non-fiction books this year. Amongst all the ones I have read here are the top three that I really enjoyed a whole lot!

1. I’m Special and Other Lies We Tell Ourselves to get through our Twenties by Ryan O’connell

 

 

This book is the bible of every twenty-somethings. I was able to relate to the majority of this book. As I have mentioned on my review here that truer words were never spoken. It is just the perfect read for lost and confused twenty-somethings such as myself, and all others who are in the same predicament. It was somewhat an affirmation of whatever you have been going through, somewhere in the world someone experiences the same thing. That you’re never really alone, that whatever is happening may it be the lowest point of your life or the ever constant struggle of starting out a career and finally stepping out of your comfort zone, these are perfectly normal. You stumble and stand up, like a cycle. This book has taught me that not everyone you meet is worthy of your time, effort and trust. That people come and go and the true ones will stay no matter how ugly things turned out. This book showed that you can never get things right the first time, that being a twenty-something in this world full of doubts and negativities may just be the best thing, because then you know who you want to be and know those who are genuinely there for you through the good and the rough times. This book spoke all the things I couldn’t, all the inhibitions and confusions. I highly recommend this one to every twenty-somethings who felt like everyone’s getting on with their lives except them, after reading this you will have that renewed passion, like you could take on anything. This one right here is truly an inspirational book.

“I don’t regret anything. And neither should you. You should remember all of it. You should remember all the time you wasted in your bed, or someone else’s bed or at some bar where you overheard the same drippy conversations. You should remember how thin you once were despite subsisting on beer and pizza. You should remember all the people you tried to love all the people who tried to love you. All the awful overpriced apartments, all the toxic friendships, and all the money you spent on things you can no longer recall. Then I want you to remember the moment you developed a keen understanding of what works for you and what doesn’t. I want you to remember being comfortable in your own skin and not feeling like you have to apologize for every little thing, I want you to remember the first time you decided not to put the entirety of your self worth in someone’s careless hands. Because moments like those are the most valuable – instances in which you felt yourself no longer becoming the person you want to but already being it. That’s pretty fucking special.”

 

2. Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris

Oh boy, this book made me laugh out loud in public, it was truly embarrassing, they all thought I lost it. Hahah but I love that in a book, it is hard to make someone laugh we all know that, but this book made it so effortless. David Sedaris has this incomparable humor. I have yet to read his other works, but Me Talk Pretty One Day took funny to whole new level. The perfect book to read after a heartbreaking book or when you just feel shitty, you know, those days. If you are looking for a light and fun read then this one I highly recommend, that is if you are okay with laughing in public and people looking at you funny haha!

“If I could believe in myself, why not give other improbabilities the benefit of the doubt? I accepted the idea that an omniscient God had cast me in his own image and that he watched over me and guided me from one place to the next. The virgin birth, the resurrection, and the countless miracles -my heart expanded to encompass all the wonders and possibilities of the universe.

A bell, though, that’s fucked up.”
― David SedarisMe Talk Pretty One Day

3. I Feel Bad About my Neck by Nora Ephron

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Nora Ephron holds nothing back. This is my second Norah Ephron read, I have read and enjoyed I Remember Nothing, now I understand why she has been a staple read of every woman young and not too young alike. She was downright funny if she wants to and can be serious when the need for it arises. I love reading her life. I love how she enjoyed every minute of it. She has distinctive voice, one you can truly relate to and agree on. She will guide you through life and the intricacies of it and how you deal with them. Bless her soul for imparting knowledge to all women, how to overcome struggles and be the person you are meant to be, living the life you wanted.

“Reading is everything. Reading makes me feel like I’ve accomplished something, learned something, become a better person. Reading makes me smarter. Reading gives me something to talk about later on. Reading is the unbelievably healthy way my attention deficit disorder medicates itself. Reading is escape, and the opposite of escape; it’s a way to make contact with reality after a day of making things up, and it’s a way of making contact with someone else’s imagination after a day that’s all too real. Reading is grist. Reading is bliss.” 
― Nora EphronI Feel Bad about My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a Woman

So there you have it, my favorite nonfiction books, I’m sure I will be encountering lots of it this year, but for now these books will stay on my top list. So what books made it to your list? I would like to know! Next week’s theme would be Top Three Villains, that should be exciting, ahhh those characters we love to hate!

 

Til next time! 🙂

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I’m Special and other lies we tell ourselves to get through our twenties by Ryan O’Connell: Book Review

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Synopsis: This hilarious part-memoir, part-manifesto reveals what sets apart the latest generation of young people coming of age in an all-wired, overeducated, and underemployed world.

People are obsessed with Ryan O’Connell’s blogs. With tens of thousands reading his pieces on Thought Catalog and Vice,watching his videos on YouTube, and hanging on to each and every #dark tweet, Ryan has established himself as a unique young voice who’s not afraid to dole out some real talk. He’s that candid, snarky friend you consult when you fear you’re spending too much time falling down virtual k-holes stalking your ex on Facebook or when you’ve made the all-too-common mistake of befriending a psycho while wasted at last night’s party and need to find a way to get rid of them the next morning. But Ryan didn’t always have the answers to these modern day dilemmas. Growing up gay and disabled with cerebral palsy, he constantly felt like he was one step behind everybody else. Then the rude curveball known as your twenties happened and things got even more confusing.

Ryan spent years as a Millennial cliché: he had dead-end internships; dabbled in unemployment; worked in his pajamas as a blogger; communicated mostly via text; looked for love online; spent hundreds on “necessary” items, like candles, while claiming to have no money; and even descended into aimless pill-popping. But through extensive trial and error, Ryan eventually figured out how to take his life from bleak to chic and began limping towards adulthood.

Sharp and entertaining, I’m Special will educate twentysomethings (or other adolescents-at-heart) on what NOT to do if they ever want to become happy fully functioning grown ups with a 401k and a dog.

Date of Publication: June 2, 2015

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

Date Read: February 25, 2015

No. of Pages: 208

Source: Net Galley.

Review:

Truer words were never spoken.

I got a copy from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. All I can say is: truer words were never spoken. Ryan O’Connell was able to present the life of twentysomethings in this wild, messy, complicated roller-coaster ride, and I couldn’t help but agree on the majority of the book. Being a twentysomething myself, I, too, have been to toxic friendships, unrequited love down to ugly relationships, and to read something like this serves as an affirmation that despite the shitty hands that we were dealt with, we can bounce back, it is just a matter of discipline and our eagerness to make a difference out of our chaotic lives. Yes, that classmate in high school who constantly posts happy photos from a vacation spent with dear friends in some exclusive island is probably as lost and as unsure of her life as you are, that college friend who posted a picture of her bright shiny red car is probably living on crackers to tide her for the week – this book made me realize that twentysomethings, including myself, loved to live in a big facade. Constantly itching to show the world only the nice things that are happening to their pathetic lives. Being a twentysomething is like being in a Britney Spears’ song Not a girl, not yet a woman. The transition is scary and more often than not, we like to stay at the shore than swim against the waves, but once we’ve kissed the ocean we are so desperate to stay afloat that we forget to breathe for a while, to enjoy how the sun kissed your skin, we forget the simple things. This wonderful made me realize that there are far more important things in life than trying to please everyone, that people will perpetually fail you in ways you cannot imagine, that at the end of a tiring day all you truly have is yourself. This book can be the bible of twentysomethings, and I am really glad I read it! Kudos to the author for writing such an incredible book!

Rating: 5 stars

“I don’t regret anything. And neither should you. You should remember all of it. You should remember all the time you wasted in your bed, or someone else’s bed or at some bar where you overheard the same drippy conversations. You should remember how thin you once were despite subsisting on beer and pizza. You should remember all the people you tried to love all the people who tried to love you. All the awful overpriced apartments, all the toxic friendships, and all the money you spent on things you can no longer recall. Then I want you to remember the moment you developed a keen understanding of what works for you and what doesn’t. I want you to remember being comfortable in your own skin and not feeling like you have to apologize for every little thing, I want you to remember the first time you decided not to put the entirety of your self worth in someone’s careless hands. Because moments like those are the most valuable – instances in which you felt yourself no longer becoming the person you want to but already being it. That’s pretty fucking special.”